Practice Approach

Doing it Better…

Creates better outcomes.

 
 

Let’s Compare Practice Model

Our approach is simply better. The standard youth hockey practice model looks something like this:

  • Practice Hours

    • 2 hours per week

    • 1 hour per session

  • Practice Focus

    • Likely minimal focus

    • Different teams on the ice with different coaches and different philosophical approaches to the game

  • Area of Practice Emphasis

    • Positions

    • Breakouts

    • Scrimmages

The outcomes of this process are well known. Minimal skill development and a focus on preparing for the next game.

Our approach is very different.

Our development model looks like this

  • Practice Hours

    • 6 to 7 hours per week

    • Minimum practice session 2 hours

      • We do this because it allows for coaches to have the time to spend on skills so that players can get it right and actually learn what they are practicing.

  • Practice Focus

    • Consistently defined for both kids and parents

    • Extended work times on skills to drive skill acquisition

    • A set philosophical approach which guides all players on the ice

  • Areas of Practice Emphasis

    • Baseline skill assessments

    • Puck control is a key theme (everything with a puck)

    • Skating with an emphasis on power turns and acceleration out of turns

    • Shooting

    • Passing

  • Competition

    • Competition is a major part of our model in that every week there is a competition day where players must compete. Skaters square off against equal competition regardless of age, gender or size. Performance in competition days can impact which group a player competes in the following week.

  • Game Concepts

    • Are addressed but not emphasized. Key areas that would be addressed, include:

      • Lane filling

      • Puck support

      • Spacing

      • Communication

We are building on the Swedish Modo and Red Army model but our focus is on developing great hockey players that are better people.

 
 
Most sports organizations don’t stick to suggested practice ratios of a minimum of 2 to 1 in Canada and 3 to 1 in the United States. In some instances Hockey Canada recommends a 6 to 1 ratio. However it is clear as noted above, if you want your kid to stick with a sport, have fun and get better, more games is definitively NOT the solution.

Most sports organizations don’t stick to suggested practice ratios of a minimum of 2 to 1 in Canada and 3 to 1 in the United States. In some instances Hockey Canada recommends a 6 to 1 ratio. However it is clear as noted above, if you want your kid to stick with a sport, have fun and get better, more games is definitively NOT the solution.

 

Above is a sample of Rick Ferroni working with the West Hartford Wolves Youth Hockey Association. Rick is a former college and professional hockey player who worked previously as the Buffalo Sabres skills coach.

Rick also trained directly under Dr. Yasha Smushkin (see more here). Rick will serve as an advisor to the Connecticut GC.